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Tuesday, April 2, 2013

NEW 4 Pictures & a Word

4 Pictures and a Word



I have added new activities to my 4 Pictures and a Word. My students LOVE this activity and ask me to play it daily. When I was evaluated with this lesson, I got all level 5s (top level). They now include:
  • Civil War Causes
  • Causes of World War I
  • Great Depression 
  • World War II
Please check back often because I will be adding more to my store







This INGENIOUS activity is similar to 4 Pics and a Word or What's the Word. It is a rigorous vocabulary activity that uses pictures to help students learn vocabulary words.

I usually play this activity in pairs and start all students at level 1. They have to keep guessing until they get the word correct then they can move on to level 2. They can be laminated so that students don't write on them and they last from year to year. 




Common Core Standards (History)
Grade 6-8
Reading Standard 4. Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 6–8 texts and topics.

Grade 9-10
Reading Standard 4. Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 9–10 texts and topics.

Grade 11-12
Reading Standard 4. Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 11–12 texts and topics.



Sunday, March 24, 2013

Guess the Word- Great Depression

This INGENIOUS activity is similar to 4 Pics and a Word or What's the Word. It is a rigorous vocabulary activity that uses pictures to help students learn vocabulary words. Currently this one is for the Great Depression but more units are coming very soon!

I usually play this activity in pairs and start all students at level 1. They have to keep guessing until they get the word correct then they can move on to level 2. They can be laminated so that students don't write on them and they last from year to year.






Correlates to State Standards

Florida

SS.912.A.5.11- Examine causes, course, and consequences of the Great Depression and the New Deal.

·      Standard:       Analyze the effects of the changing social, political, and economic conditions of the Roaring Twenties and the Great Depression


California

11.6 Students analyze the different explanations for the Great Depression and how the New Deal fundamentally changed the role of the federal government.

1. Describe the monetary issues of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries that gave rise to the establishment of the Federal Reserve and the weaknesses in key sectors of the economy in the late 1920s.

2. Understand the explanations of the principal causes of the Great Depression and the steps taken by the Federal Reserve, Congress, and Presidents Herbert Hoover and Franklin Delano Roosevelt to combat the economic crisis.

3. Discuss the human toll of the Depression, natural disasters, and unwise agricultural practices and their effects on the depopulation of rural regions and on political movements of the left and right, with particular attention to the Dust Bowl refugees and their social and economic impacts in California.

4. Analyze the effects of and the controversies arising from New Deal economic policies and the expanded role of the federal government in society and the economy since the 1930s (e.g., Works Progress Administration, Social Security, National Labor Relations Board, farm programs, regional development policies, and energy development projects such as the Tennessee Valley Authority, California Central Valley Project, and Bonneville Dam).



Tennessee

8.4 Identify the changes in social and cultural life caused by the Great Depression and the Dust Bowl (i.e., Hoovervilles, Bonus Army, migrations, worldwide economic depression, Democrat victory in 1932, widespread poverty, unemployment, religious revivalism).


Virginia

VUS.10   The student will demonstrate knowledge of key domestic events of the 1920s and 1930s by

b)    assessing the causes and consequences of the stock market crash of 1929;

c)     explaining the causes of the Great Depression and its impact on the American people;

d)    describing how Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal relief, recovery, and reform measures addressed the Great Depression and expanded the government’s role in the economy.



Common Core Standards (History)
Grade 6-8
Reading Standard 4. Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 6–8 texts and topics.

Grade 9-10
Reading Standard 4. Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 9–10 texts and topics.

Grade 11-12
Reading Standard 4. Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 11–12 texts and topics.

Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Wednesday, August 1, 2012

Using Technology to Make History Come ALIVE!

I presented a presentation to a WONDERFUL group of teachers at Memphis City Schools today. The presentation was entitled, "Using Technology to Make History Come ALIVE!" Here is the PowerPoint for that presentation.

Sunday, July 22, 2012

Teaching Online


Teaching Online
In my six years of teaching, I have has taught via a distance learning environment, online (high school classes), and in a regular school (brick and mortar). Many people are surprised that I am able to teach online classes for high school. I usually get asked the same questions:  What is it like? How does it work? Do you teach online while working in a regular school? Do you need to be tech savvy? How much are you paid? I will answer these questions here. Even though this is related to my online teaching experience, most answers are common to most online teaching employers.

What is it like? I love it! I don’t have to worry with behavior management, students are held more responsible for their work, there is no pressure to make test scores, and best of all I can do it all on my own schedule. 
How does it work? With my school, the courses are already designed for me. Therefore, I never have to make activities. The only time I have to create an assignment is IF I want to give extra credit. Most grading is done by the computer but I have to grade essays, special projects, and very few other activities. I must have a 15-20 minute online class lecture or interactive activity once a week. It is at the same time each week and students are encouraged to come. Also I must have “office hours” once a week which is basically a one hour session when I am available in my online classroom for students to drop in and ask questions, etc. Additionally, I must call all my students at least 3 times a semester to check on them and/or to offer assistance if needed. I must inform parents or mentors when students are participating or falling behind. The number of classes and students you have depends on need. Last semester, I had about 20 students in 9 different classes (all with the Social Studies content area)
Do you have to be certified? Yes. Online schools are also going to require that you have a full educator license. I was able to use my current state license (Tennessee) even though I taught students in Hawaii, Arkansas, South Carolina and a few other states (don’t ask me how)
Do you teach online while working in a regular school? How do you manage your time? Yes. I teach at a regular urban high school for Memphis City Schools and I also teach online for K12. I teach for Memphis City Schools during the day and work for K12 mostly after school and on the weekends. I do K12 work usually every other day and on the weekends, unless I have a lot of grading to do. I teach part time but some people do teach full time.
Do you need to be tech savvy?  Somewhat. You do need basic computer skills like working in a Microsoft Word document, creating  Power Points, attaching documents, finding documents on your computers, sending emails, etc. Also there will be extra security restrictions you must make with your internet connection and on certain documents. They will train you for that.
How much are you paid? Well I’m not going to give you a specific amount. However I am paid weekly. And the amount (at least for my company) is based on a formula. It depends on how many students I have, how many classes I have, and whether those classes and students are AP (AP is worth a little more).

If you have any additional questions, please feel free to contact me at kimberlyscott05@gmail.com or on twitter @ingeniousteach